Georgina Berkeley, from the Berkeley Album, 1867-71, Watercolor and albumen silver prints, Musee d'Orsay, Paris. Photo: Reunion des Musees Nationaux/Art Resource, NY

Georgina Berkeley, from the Berkeley Album, 1867-71, Watercolor and albumen silver prints, Musee d’Orsay, Paris. Photo: Reunion des Musees Nationaux/Art Resource, NY

Photography was invented in 1839, and in no time small photographic portraits – cartes de visites– became popular as calling cards and souvenirs. In the 1860’s and ‘70’s aristocratic British women who, this exhibition indicates, led very busy lives, managed to find time to create photocollages using pieces they cut from the cartes de visites, usually the heads, and pasting them on their own watercolors and drawings to create witty, sarcastic, commemorative, and often wildly surrealistic images. They gathered their work into albums.   Not all who did this work were aristocratic British women but it was particularly their domain. The exhibit is a bounty of their images and albums.