Yvonne Korshak reviews Off-Broadway, Broadway, Film and Art

Author: Yvonne Korshak Page 1 of 39

Author, Art Historian

Interests: literature, film, theater, classics, archaeology, classical literature, ancient greece, classical archaeology, off-broadway theater books

Yvonne Korshak in Podcast on Pericles and Aspasia, Sophocles, Antigone, and ancient Greek theater

It was a pleasure being a recent guest on Philip Rowe’s podcast, The History of European Theatre! Our free ranging discussion covers ancient Greek theatre, Sophocles’ Antigone, and more. Listen here: https://player.captivate.fm/episode/7fffb42c-e901-4da6-b19b-5eb0a6b44eeb.

My new historical novel that was the starting point for our discussion is Pericles and Aspasia: A Story of Ancient Greece, available at book sellers including Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

The theater at Epidaurus, Greece, built over 2400 years ago, is still in use today.

 

 

 

 

 

My novel Pericles and Aspasia — reviewed

The first review of my novel, Pericles and Aspasia: A Story of Ancient Greece, from Book Life — an Editor’s Pick

The fiction debut of Korshak, a professor at Adelphi University, brings vital life to the golden age of Athens, in a story rich with character, romance, striking historical detail, and spirited public debate on topics foundational to our civilization. The novel centers, as the title suggests, on Pericles, the Athenian statesman and orator known for his democratic values and championing of learning, and his Aspasia, the courtesan whom Pericles will risk his position and reputation to love. “Look at the company he keeps, they’ll say of you,” the great sculptor Phidias says to Pericles, “whores, philosophers and sculptors.”

But Korshak makes clear, in memorable scenes, that this supportive partnership didn’t just bring them comfort, happiness, and a child: it shaped history.Epic-length as well as the kick-off to a longer series, Pericles and Aspasia offers rousing speeches, naval battles, passionate embraces, rebellion, and political intrigue as Pericles strives to hold together the allied cities of the Athenian League. But Korshak sets her novel apart through its lively evocation of the civic life, art, culture, and gossip that make cities great. The pages pulse with talk that’s alternately philosophical, lofty, witty, and dishy. Early on, flirting with Aspasia, Pericles ruminates on how a recent comic play called him “our cucumber-headed Zeus.” Much later, he’ll ask “So, Aspasia, since you’ve read Antigone, do you think Sophocles means the autocratic Creon to be me?”

This immersion in Athenian life will thrill readers fascinated with the grain of lives far removed from our own—but still concerned with similar pressing issues of justice and governance. Historic notables (Euripides, Herodotus, Thucydides, Hippodamus) never make mere cameos: they inveigh, debate, even—especially in the case of that ol’ gadfly Socrates—joke. “I could prove you’re more expert, but by winning the argument, I’d lose it,” he says, drawing a clear line from 5th century B.C. to Shakespeare’s clowns to Groucho Marx.

Takeaway: A stellar, epic-length evocation of the golden age of Athens, rich with historical insight.

Great for fans of: Christian Meier’s Athens: A Portrait of the City in its Golden Age, Mary Renault.

“An insightful depiction of a passionate relationship.”

                                                                    Kirkus Reviews

Available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Booktopia, and on local online booksellers worldwide.

Cape Sounion Athens as Aspasia Might Have Seen It

Cape Sounion Athens as Aspasia Might Have Seen It

 

 

 

What’s “American” about Sinclair Lewis’s It Can’t Happen Here?

In a discussion of Sinclair Lewis’s novel, It Can’t Happen Here, written in 1935, one person said, “This could be about any dictatorship, couldn’t it? Is there anything particularly American about this dictatorship? I felt I had an answer but it took time to think it out. Here it is:

I believe that what makes the book specifically American is Lewis’s use of the landscape. The vast American landscape, as we know, has been an embodiment of the promise of America, a symbolism which, as has been widely recognized, is an aspect of 19th century American landscape painting.   From minus-Day 1, leaving the Old World you could move to the New World for a better life (however you defined it).  New settlements.  Homesteading.  What a contrast with the Old World!  In America, those who were born free were animated by the idea that if you didn’t like where you were, you could go where you thought things would be better.  Good heavens,what a boon came with that birthright!  There was always a “new frontier”.  Then, Manifest Destiny bumped up to an end in the 1870’s, but the cultural imagination takes eons to catch up. The belief in new frontiers open to Americans was vibrant up to and during the 1930’s and way beyond.  In John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath (1938), in which the westward migration is a central theme, the “Okies”actually reach the edge of the continent–like Lewis, Steinbeck already had a nuanced view that left room for hope.

Lewis was born in the Midwest, Minnesota, in 1886 (at the tail end of “Manifest Destiny”). In shaping the story so that his main character, Doremus Jessup, travels from his home in New England to the West, Lewis mirrors the American migration westward. In going west, Doremus’s hopes are for both himself and America.  And Lewis makes sure that Doremus appreciates the vast western skies.  In giving us a glimpse of those unbounded skies through the eyes of his character, Lewis, at the end of his novel, intensifies our hopes  …sends us to maybe... thereby making all the more powerful the uncertainty, and the ironic potential, with which he leaves us.

Albert Bierstadt, Rocky Mountains, Flander’s Peak, 1863, 6’2″ x 10′ 1″, oil on canvas, Metropolitan Museum of Art. Public Domain

Review | Shakespeare’s As You Like It | Directed by John Doyle | Bay Street Theater, Sag Harbor, Long Island

…  without enchantment …

As You Like It is a wonderful play so that, even with this disappointing production, it’s not a wasted evening.  The language is so powerful and some of the scenes so funny that they surpass the flat interpretations they receive here, and in particular two actors —  André de Shields and Leenya Rideout – are satisfyingly perfect!

Review | Thoroughly Modern Millie | Book by Richard Morris and Dick Scanlan | Music by Jeanine Tesori | Lyrics by Dick Scanlan | North Fork Community Theatre, Mattituck, Long Island

A delightful musical filled with laughs — that’s Thoroughly Modern Millie, presented with youthfully energetic and thoroughly enjoyable performances at the North Fork Community Theatre.

Review | Intimate Apparel | By Lynn Nottage | Bay Street Theatre, Sag Harbor, Long Island

… spinning a play from a photograph …

Intimate Apparel is a good play, worth seeing, though it’s not a you-must-see-it play like Lynn Nottage’s Ruined (2008) or her more recent Sweat, both of which won the Pulitzer Prize. Nottage is a fine, intelligent playwright and to spend the evening with her through the medium of this play, written early in her career (2003), is satisfying and thought-provoking.

Jules Feiffer's "The Man in the Ceiling" at Bay Street Theater, Sag Harbor, L.I., NY

Review | The Man in the Ceiling | Book by Jules Feiffer | Music and Lyrics by Andrew Lippa | Bay Street Theatre, Sag Harbor, Long Island

… segregation … 

The idea of this new musical show is that the world can be rough on for a little boy with a big imagination. Unfortunately this show can be rough on the audience.

Review | Rotterdam | by Jon Brittain | Directed by Donnacadh O’Briain | 59E59 Theaters

… love and gender …

Fiona (Anna Martine Freeman) and Alice (Alice McCarthy) are two young women lovers, expatriate Brits living in Rotterdam.  On the very evening that Alice is composing an email to her parents to finally let them know that she is gay, Fiona drops a bombshell:  she tells Alice that she, Fiona, is truly a transgender man, and that she intends to transition to being physically male.

Review | The Antipodes | By Annie Baker | Signature Theatre

… bored room …

The Antipodes is a distasteful play.

Review | Cabaret | Book by Joe Masteroff | Lyrics by Fred Ebb | Music by Joe Kander | North Fork Community Theatre, Mattituck, Long Island

…  for sure come to Cabaret

If you want to see a top-notch production of  one of the best American musicals, see Cabaret at the North Fork Community Theatre.  The songs, the musical splendor, the theatrical extravaganza and the powerful story are wonderfully realized in this production, and with an orchestra of eight fine players – you don’t always get live music like that on Broadway.

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