Let's Talk Off Broadway

Yvonne Korshak reviews Off-Broadway, Broadway, Film and Art

Tag: Metropolitan Museum of Art (Page 1 of 3)

Questioning the Past at Rojas' The Theater of Disappearance. Metropolitan Museum of Art, Roof Garden. All photos Robert Ruben and Yvonne Korshak.

Art Review | The Theater of Disappearance by Adrián Villar Rojas | Metropolitan Museum of Art Roof Garden

… the party’s over …

A. Villar Rojas, The Theater of Disappearance, Metropolitan Museum Roof Garden, Summer 2017

It looks like a party — all those banquet tables (my heart lifted as I thought we’d be served refreshments!)   But don’t try to take a seat.  Only one figure is seated at a table, and his plate is empty (left).

As you move through this world of white, you see the tables are cluttered with elegant but toppled empty goblets, plates and platters with ancient imagery, askew, moldy rolls, chicken bones and scavenger crabs.  On others tables are recumbent figures, alive and dead, writhing humans entwined with tomb effigies. Black sculptures, with chalky white dust drifted onto them, surround and punctuate the “banquet.”

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A. Villar Rojas, The Theater of Disappearance, Metropolitan Museum Roof Garden, Summer 2017

Art Review | First Look and The NY Times got it all wrong | The Theater of Disappearance | Adrian Villar Rojas | Metropolitan Museum Roof Garden

  • The New York Times got it All WRONG.  
  • I kid you not.

* Friday, April 14, 2017, Weekend Arts II, “A Mini-Met Mashup on the Roof” by Jason Farago

It’s no mashup.  My own review will follow as quickly as I can write it.  Meanwhile, have a look …

For my full review, go up one or click here.

The Theater of Disappearance, Rojas' rooftop installation for the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC, Summer 2017

A Musical DEcomposition   (my title)

A Musical Decomposition. Rojas' The Theater of Disappearance, Metropolitan Museum of Art Roof Installation Summer 2017

A Musical DEcomposition — detail

Strongman, Qindynasty (221-206 B.C.), Terracotta, H. 61 3/4 in. (156.8 cm), Lent by Emperor Qinshihuang's Mausoleum Site Museum.

Art Review | Age Of Empires: Chinese Art of the Qin & Han Dynasties (221 B.C.-A.D.220) | Metropolitan Museum of Art

… when China became China …

Here is an opportunity to see some of the most remarkable objects of art and archaeology excavated in China.  Because some are so lavish, and in some cases unique, a number have been featured in Western publications including newspapers and magazines, but most have never been seen outside of China.The Qin and Han dynasties together make up the classical period of Chinese art and culture, when the basic forms of political organization and intellectual and artistic paradigms were formed.   The key theme of this period, and of this exhibition, is unification of the vast territory of China under the powerful Qin emperor, Qinshihuang, and its maintenance and expansion in the Han dynasty.

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Max Beckmann in New York, exhibition at Metropolitan Museum, NY, October 19-2016 -February 20, 2017

Art Review | Max Beckmann in New York | Exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum, NY | October 19, 2016 – February 20, 2017

… great expressive power …

Max Beckmann was one of the greatest artists of the 20th century.  In a way, his tragic vision was the truest.

The exhibition includes works made during the three years he spent in New York at the end of his life and works that may have been made elsewhere but are in New York collections.  The focus is on paintings — Beckmann was also a draughtsman, printmaker, sculptor and writer — and though not comprehensive it brings to the viewer the full range of Beckmann’s painting.

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Parker's Transitional Object (PsychoBarn) reflected in the glass of Temple of Dendur gallery while museum Director Thomas Campbell speaks at the press opening

Art Review | Cornelia Parker’s Transitional Object (PsychoBarn) | Metropolitan Museum Roof | Summer 2016

… they never promised us a “real” garden …

Cornelia Parker, Transitional Object (PsychoBarn), site specific installation on roof of Metropolitan Museum, summer 2016

When is a house not a house?  When it’s a Transitional Object (PsychoBarn) by Cornelia Parker, site specific installation for summer 2016, Roof Garden of the Metropolitan Museum

When I first saw photos of Cornelia Parker’s Transitional Object in a newspaper, I thought oh no, why do they have to stick an eyesore on the museum’s lovely roof garden.  When I went to see it actually I found that it’s an intriguing eyesore, not what I’d like best to see on the roof but it does get you thinking.

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Art Review | “Roof Garden Installation” by Pierre Huyghe | The Metropolitan Museum of Art | Summer 2015

… only there’s no “garden”…

Paving stones are uprooted and water is tricking in and around — is the maintenance crew working on a leak?  No. This is the new art installation on the roof of the Metropolitan Museum.

Huyghe roof garden installation, schist boulder

Huyghe’ roof garden installation, schist boulder

The site is magnificent, nestled in Central Park and among magnificent New York skyline views, but this installation, which has no title, is dull.

In the midst of it all, there’s a large, unworked boulder of Manhattan schist, the stone that forms the familiar outcroppings in Central Park, and supports Manhattan’s skyscrapers.   Some stone dust scattered around the boulder is said to have shaken off during the stone’s transport to the museum, and the artist chose to leave where it settles.

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Art Review | Van Gogh: Irises and Roses | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

… together and apart …

Van Gogh, Irises, 1890, o/c, 36 1/2" x 29 1/8" (92.7 cm x l73.9 cm), Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, Photo: Metropolitan Museum of Art

Van Gogh, Irises, 1890, o/c, 36 1/2″ x 29 1/8″ (92.7 cm x l73.9 cm), Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, Photo: Metropolitan Museum of Art

This is the first time the two paintings of irises and two of roses are exhibited together, the way van Gogh conceived them and in the order he painted them, four paintings, but monumental in terms of their importance for the history of art – like just about everything van Gogh did in his short life.

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Art Review | Thomas Hart Benton’s America Today Mural Rediscovered | Metropolitan Museum of Art

Thomas Hart Benton’s murals, America Today, have an immediate impact of color, exuberance, and resonant ideas.  Urban and rural, old ways and new, labor and entertainment, freedom and oppression, rich, poor, and all the way through the middle:  the view is so wide and comprehensive it seems to really encompass, in broad strokes and specifics, the essence of America in a defining view.  At the same time, the murals span in spirit two epochs  — the excesses and abundance of the “Jazz Age” of the 20’s, formative for Benton’s imagination, and the bitter advance of the Great Depression.

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art – The New David H. Koch Plaza, New York, NY

… one of New York’s favorite theaters …

The moment the fountains of the new David H. Koch Plaza at the Metropolitan Museum were first (officially) turned on

The moment the fountains of the new David H. Koch Plaza at the Metropolitan Museum were first (officially) turned on

The fountains that ran along the front of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, though they still looked beautiful and continued to toss their refreshing waters, had severe internal problems in the pipes and plumbing.  Museum Trustee David H. Koch expressed willingness to pay for repairs, an offer that morphed into a total re-design of the public spaces, four blocks long, that span the front of the museum, including removing the old fountains and installing new ones.  We were told at the ceremony dedicating the new plaza that Mr. Koch said “Why don’t I pay for everything including the extras?” and he did at a cost of $65 million.

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Art Review | Boxer at Rest, Greek bronze sculpture of the Hellenistic period, late 4th-2nd century B.C., loan exhibit | Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC, June 1 – July 15, 2013

… humanity …

Boxer at Rest, Greek bronze sculpture

This is a rare opportunity to see one of the finest and most compelling works of art ever made. The bronze Boxer*  is somewhat over life-size but so immediate it’s hard to think it’s not a “real” man — and a man of total experience:  exhausted but powerful, brutalized but handsome, dazed by what’s hit him but alert for whatever’s coming his way.  Ready.

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